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It’s reasonably light, and you can carry a lot of it around with you if you like using lots of rope.

So I’m going to go into the pros and cons of a few different ropes. And naturally I’ll tell you which are my favorites and why, but at the end of the day I’ll leave you to make up your own mind, based on your own sets of priorities, which may very well be different from mine. Answered the whole question, just like that. And wasn’t it just frustrating as hell? This is another synthetic bondage rope, and has many of the same properties of that rope mentioned immediately above, particularly in regards to friction. However, there are some advantages and improvements with this one which I will go over. Hemp, Jute, Sisal, Cotton, Coconut. “Synthetic Fiber” Ropes:. The combination of the lack of weight and the lack of friction means it’s going to slide a bit over skin. Your ties may not stay in exactly the same place as you put them, riding up or down, etc.

That’s right, it doesn’t degrade. It IMPROVES. Jute makes for extremely good photos in it’s un-dyed state. It generally has very clean lines, and has a sort of compelling aesthetic to it which honestly can make a person fall in love with it. I realize that what I just wrote may be true, but it’s not actually useful. In fact, I’ve seen people exhibit immense frustration over such responses.

Hemp is one of the natural fibre ropes that is commonly used for shibari. It’s generally pricier than anything synthetic, and my understanding is that it’s used a lot over in the US. It’s reasonably light, and you can carry a lot of it around with you if you like using lots of rope. Because it’s a natural fibre rope with decent tooth, you can do shibari and other styles of rope that rely on friction over knots, which is pretty great. And wasn’t it just frustrating as hell? No. The same goes for this as the other synthetic ropes with regards to friction; you will need to use knots. Summary:.

This is another synthetic bondage rope, and has many of the same properties of that rope mentioned immediately above, particularly in regards to friction. However, there are some advantages and improvements with this one which I will go over. Excellent give and flex, and there’s something truly awesome about the way it moves in your hands and when you’re wrapping it around someone. It makes the experience of tying someone a lot more fun. I recommend rope of 5 millimeters or above for safety reasons. I generally get rope of 5 or 6 millimeters in diameter.

It generally has very clean lines, and has a sort of compelling aesthetic to it which honestly can make a person fall in love with it. Knots that look so-so with cotton or synthetic somehow look amazing with jute. And this is why I strongly advise that you DO NOT buy your rope from Peaches and Cream or any other sex shop. That stuff is vastly overpriced for what it is. Likely to get a very good life span with it. It feels really soft and smooth; very good flex, too. Depending on the source of your rope, it can be a real pain in the ass of a rope for a beginner, because the knots in what I got from the 1-8 dollar shop compact down like you wouldn’t believe. You can spend ages trying to unpick those things, which leads to swearing and frustration and a general lack of cool. Knots that look so-so with cotton or synthetic somehow look amazing with jute. It has a sort of liveliness to it.